King Kooba – Enter The Throne Room

0 0
Read Time:2 Minute, 53 Second

kingkoothrone

But who is the King?

It was the turn of the millennium when the hype around dowtempo slash electronica slash headz slash chillout was reaching enormous levels. Hundreds of projects popped up everywhere, fueled by the success of its early protagonists, hoping to catch some of the limelight that was seemingly easy to reach. King Kooba is a good example – even if they definitely weren’t in it for fame and fortune. They did their thing. And if they never really took off big time, then it wasn’t because of a lack of quality or depth, it was because of their concept – or the difficulties in finding one.

This album does offer a lot of quality material. It is intriguingly eclectic, clearly well produced, and there are enough tracks that don’t lose charm after several rounds of listening. “Enter The Throne Room” did find its way into my DJ bag lots of times, and it didn’t just stay there waiting to be played.

“California Suite” got a lot of plays, a really slick track for an elegant evening at the bar or lounge. Relaxed beats, classy use of strings, the clever integration of an a capella by Esther Phillips  – there’s definitely nothing to complain about. Or “Koobesq”. A piece that could have just as well come from benchmark producers Thievery Corporation, featuring a convincing performance of vocalist Melissa Heathcote.

You might also enjoy “Single Malt”, sitting in a good place between Lounge and Drum’n’Bass. You might as well argue that the attempt to produce coolness is a little too obvious – but then, the whole genre was created to primarily do just that.

“Spectra In C Minor” is further expanding the range of styles, speeding things up without losing the relaxed attitude, a simple yet effective bass line, solid work on the drum parts – this could have come from the likes of  Red Snapper, and that clearly is a compliment.

Theoretically – if “Enter The Throne Room” had kept the material to a single longplayer and not two, it probably would have been an excellent album. Would have. Things start to become complicated on side three. “Terminal X” is a dark mixture of restrained Drum’n’Bass and something like Jazz. It sounds like something that would work nicely in a live set – but on this album it isn’t much more than an exercise. An attempt.

The “Pugwash Beats” take us to abstract Hip Hop spheres, and we begin to understand the problem of this album: with every new track, a new box is opened, and instead of marveling at the many facets of “Enter The Throne Room” we increasingly suspect a lack of concept. Even the slick production of Simon Richmond a.k.a. Palm Skin Productions doesn’t change that.

Side four reinforces this impression with some hectic Drum’n’Bass on “Fraternity” and “Catscratch”. Track after track you keep wondering how that really cool and competent downtempo project could turn into such a joyless D’n’B exercise.

It’s really sad. In the end you’re sitting there a little confused and aggravated by these relentless beats, and even while they are still beating you already know that this second vinyl will probably not leave the sleeve again. But the first one is really good. The one that gets it a place in the DJ bag for the evening at the bar. Better than nothing.

KING KOOBA – ENTER THE THRONE ROOM – SECOND SKIN – SKINLP005 – 6/10

Find and buy this release on Discogs: Click

About Post Author

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Four Tet – Pause

0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 29 Second

fourtet-pause

Press play for Pause

Some folks are just born to make music. They can’t start early enough, create remarkable stuff from day one, keep evolving and building a community of fans, they are just all music. Kieran Hebden is one of them, without any doubt. First recording deal at age 15, first remix on a Warp anniversary album, and from there it was just always upward and forward.

When “Pause” was released in 2001 it was already his sixth album. Four had been released with his first band Fridge, as well as his first album as Four Tet – “Dialogue”. But it really was this album that started his career –  “Dialogue” was an attempt to create a unique style based on Hip Hop beats and Jazz samples, still a little too demure and heady.

Things definitely changed on “Pause” towards a much more playful and approachable – with the magic trick being that he kept an aura if introversion, someone that could work on sounds and song ideas forever in his studio without ever running the risk of getting lonely. Plus, the mix of elements that he came up with for this album seems a lot less constructed, much more harmonious and coherent. His approach matured from quoting to blending, from using things to embracing them. Long before anyone began quietly talking about a Folk revival he was already working with acoustic guitars, folk-ish harmonies and a sound universe that seemed a lot more natural than most of what was published in what back in those days was called downtempo. He just took one step and was immune from being shoved in this category.

Compared to what Hebden was going to release on the next two album, “Pause” is almost straightforward, more linear – but he already had a considerably different attitude towards the things, topics, images he was conjuring up with his music. Instead of talking about something he would rather let us feel what he wants to put across. Like on “Glue Of The World” for example is as dewy and unwound as a Sunday morning in the meadows. When everyone still wanted to be cool and slick he was already evocative and real.

On the way to “Pause” he seems to also have found his love for little bells and chimes and other things that jingle, jiggle and ring, and a tendency to let them do their thing with a playful disregard of what the beat is doing. You can feel it, he doesn’t just put them in sequence and then loosen things up with a funky little feature of a sequencer. It’s manual and deliberate, the rhythm more a suggestion than a rule. As if he would let the sounds be where they want to be. “Twenty Three” is a great example – it’s not about the beat, it’s about perception and imagination.

Every now and then, short pieces that work like nicely connecting interludes explore the opportunities of interplay between music, life and play, incorporating all kinds of sounds from offices to children playing, or telling a tiny little story as on “Leila Came Round And We Watched A Video” – a touching piece that tells us they were definitely not watching an action movie or a thriller. Simply lovely.

“Untangle” makes sure that we don’t fall asleep in front of the TV – a slowly grooving piece of… what? House? Minimal? Untangled, uncluttered and almost straight if it weren’t for the harp-like theme that again has its own idea of what’s straight. Might have just been the moment when Mr. Hebden discovered his love for danceable stuff – a passion that would grow considerably over the years.

“Everything Is Alright” is almost a signature track here, with a rhythmic structure that is unique not due to its intricateness but rather due to the use of elements – no one is able to let big, almost kettle sized drums sound so playful and light. Yes, in spite of the big drums, everything is alright, and the guitar theme is a testament to that.

The one track that somehow doesn’t work (at least for me) is “No More Mosquitoes”. I don’t know. The dragging, heavy beat, the distorted samples, bleeps and noises – it’s not coming across as organic as the rest of the album, it actually has the power to annoy the listener more than just a mosquito. Sorry.

Apart from the bells and chimes, the other main element that seemed to fascinate Mr. Hebden was a wide variety of guitars, harps, zithers and sitars. Whether it’s in the little episodes or the longer tracks, they do most of the melodic work, nicely crafted repetitive themes that elevate tracks like “You Could Ruin My Day” – the longest piece on the album. Again, the basic rhythmic structure is mostly straightforward, everything else takes as many liberties as is needed to keep our curiosity on a high level.

Most of what we hear on this album is on a level that is much closer to Boards Of Canada than to most of what crowded the downbeat years. Playing with genres and their elements, staying wonderfully organic in a production style that is usually dubbed electronic, being decidedly urban with a big yearning for nature and freedom. The beginning of a long and hugely creative career.

FOUR TET – PAUSE – DOMINO – WIGLP94 – 8/10

Find and buy this release on Discogs: Click

About Post Author

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Benjamin Herman – Deal

0 0
Read Time:2 Minute, 39 Second

deahermanl

When the soundtrack is longer than the film

Benjamin Herman is from the Netherlands, and he plays the saxophone. He is leading a band called the New Cool Collective and has played on the side of Candy Dulfer. Some years ago, he was voted best dress Dutchman by “Esquire”.

Profilers among us might deduct from this list of facts that Mr. Herman is an aficionado of the smoother, more loungy kind of jazz and swing, the kind of music that is far enough above what would register as muzak but might put wrinkles on the noses of one or the other jazz enthusiast. Add the fact that he invited the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra for this album and you can guess that this is a pretty dapper “Deal”.

But hold your noses. “Deal” only gets gooey in a few weak moments, and it does have style, it’s even a pretty lively affair for the most part. It’s the soundtrack for a film directed by a guy called Eddy Terstall. It’s a thirty minute flick about a man, a woman and a fistful of Euros. He asked Benjamin Herman to do the soundtrack and he was so enthusiastic about it that it turned out to have a longer playing time than the actual film. 

Conceptually, “Deal” is kind of a slick homage to the music of spy flicks of the sixties and seventies. Mr. Herman was serious about the whole thing. Very. He worked on this for over a year, started out with four guys in the studio and ended up hiring the above mentioned orchestra. For good reason, we must admit – the strings are marvelous. 

His band members are just as capable. Manuel Hugas plays his Höfner bass guitar like someone that just exited a time machine, arriving from the late 60s, Joost Kroon shows a lot of versatility, Jesse van Ruller operates his guitar with elegance, and Carlo de Wijs really knows how to use his  Hammond to make this affair a classy one. Benjamin Herman himself is not really breaking a sweat operating his sax, and he is not drowning in clichés – an achievement, really – too many shmoozers have given the instrument a bit of a bad reputation, especially in this loungy segment.

You might want to disagree regarding the clichés though, depending on where you put the threshold. Bond movie inspirations, trips to the cocktail bar, moderate funk excursions, moments ranging from drama to sensuality, it’s all there, and Herman’s band puts it on the stage in style. It’s civilized, you can keep your tie on and even twist a little bit. In its wildest moments you can even imagine him being secretly inspired by Tarantino soundtracks.

Don’t get me wrong – this is a pretty decent effort, and it has its moments. It’s an entertaining little soundtrack that was created with care, and just in case there’s a kind of upscale cocktail lounge sort of place with slick people partying in distinguished fashion and you’re supposed to play some appropriate music, take this along to entertain them. You can’t go wrong.

BENJAMIN HERMAN – DEAL – DOX RECORDS – DOX165 – 6/10

Find and buy this album on Discogs: Click

About Post Author

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Kelpe – Sea Inside Body

0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 6 Second

KELPE_VINYL_front550

Das Meer in dir

Die Welt der elektronischen Musik ist bisweilen auch nicht so viel anders als die des Pop oder Rock, genau betrachtet. Manche Künstler gelten einfach grundsätzlich als Referenz, als Helden, erhaben und quasi per Definition immer gut. Da können die auch mal ein Jahrzehnt lang Sachen machen, die außer alt eingesessenen Fans niemanden interessieren, aber am Denkmal rüttelt man nicht. Springsteen. Wenn der morgen das Lied von Wum und Wendelin neu aufnimmt, sind alle voller Ehrfurcht.

Das gleiche gilt, eben auf der elektronischen Seite des musikalischen Entertainments, für Boards of Canada. Da geht eigentlich schon lange nicht mehr wirklich etwas voran, aber wenn du da mal sagst, hey die neue BoC ist echt müde, dann musst du aufpassen, dass dich nicht gleich ein paar Fans vierteilen. Dabei gibt es durchaus Leute, die in der Lage sind, ähnlich spannende Musik zu machen. Kel McKeown zum Beispiel, besser bekannt unter den Namen Kelpe.

Während sich Boards of Canada eigentlich immer der gleichen Welt elektronisch nostalgifizierter Sounds distanzierter Wehmut widmen, gibt Kelpe auf “Sea Inside Body” der ganzen Sache einen etwas frischeren, nahbareren, verspielteren Anstrich. Eigenwillige Samples, schwurbelnde Synthesizer, minimale Melodien, jede Menge Ambient Elemente – die Zutatenlisten sind fast identisch, die Resultate nur bedingt.

“Ice Cream Knife Handle” gleich am Anfang der LP zum Beispiel – im Bezug auf die Synthesizer Sounds durchaus BoC Nähe, aber der Beat ist dann doch zwingender, präsenter, etwas deutlicher auf den Groove schielend. Klar, bevor es zu sehr Dancefloor Charakter bekommt, geht man auch gern mal ganz raus aus dem Beat und lässt die Synths wabern, im Grunde aber geht Kelpe merklich schwungvoller an die Arbeit, und lässt ein wenig mehr Sonne rein.

Gut so, klar – hier wird nicht kopiert, hier wird eine ganz eigene kleine Welt konstruiert. “Sickly Situation” häckselt ein paar Samples über trockene Beats, lässt es im Hintergrund knistern und rauschen, gibt ne eher schräge Bassline und nimmt zwischendurch den Beat so auseinander, dass der Titel fast zum Programm wird. In “Nat’s Twirly Mug” eröffnet ein kleines elektronisches Glockenspiel, das dann erneut von trickreichen Beat Tracks begleitet wird. Was Kel McKeown einfach richtig gut drauf hat: mit verschiedenen Synthesizer Sounds auf unterschiedlichen Ebenen Themen miteinander spielen zu lassen, sich abwechselnd und ineinandergreifend – es wird nie langweilig und ist immer wirklich exzellent produziert.

“Age Sculpture” ist ein weiteres schönes Beispiel – feine Syntharbeit, lebhafte Beats, nette Melodien. Nur wird hier der eine etwas beklagenswertere Punkt dieses Albums deutlich, denn irgendwann bei der Entstehung des Albums muss der gute Kel auf die etwas seltsame Idee gekommen sein, ein paar weibliche britische Teenager bei ihren Unterhaltungen zu belauschen und die aufgenommenen Gespräche ins Album einzubauen. In diesem Stück größtenteils verfremded, aber in manchem Intermezzo kommen dann so wenig tiefgreifende Statements zu Tage wie “Ich kann es kaum erwarten, 16 zu werden” oder “Früher haben wir uns Bier und Pizza bestellt, heute koche ich lieber”. Die Banalität in ihrer unkommentiert verwendeten Form passt einfach nicht zum hohen musikalischen Niveau des Albums.

Aber größtenteils sind die Teenies ja still, wie in “Keep Danger”, das erneut kunstvoll konstruierte Drums mit weit ausladenden Synth Themen koppelt und dank einer dynamischen Bassline auch mal mit fast treibendem Tempo aufwartet. “Overland But Underwater” ist ein kleines melodisches Einod auf sattem Elektrobeat, “Grappling Hook” knarzt und rumpelt zwischendurch recht beschwerlich, und “Knock, Turn” setzt aus verzerrten Xylophon Sounds eine geloopte Basismelodie zusammen, auf der mit Sounds und Effekten gespielt wird – bei Kelpe ist immer was los.

Das schöne daran ist, dass es in diesen kunstvoll zusammengestellten Klangräumen immer etwas zu entdecken gibt. Kleine Geräusche oder Melodieansätze, feine Harmoniewechsel, ein paar eingestreute Sounds – auch das trägt viel zum Liebreiz des Albums bei. Allenfalls hätte Kelpe hier und da ein wenig kondensieren können – kurze Zwischenspiele wie “Care Of Presto Mini” oder die erwähnten Girlie-Zitate tragen zumindest nicht zu konzeptioneller Klarheit bei.

Das (mehr oder weniger) Titelstück “There’s A Sea In Your Body” wagt viel schräge Sounds und Harmonien, lässt den Beat schwer elektronisch schwappen – fast hat man das Gefühl, dass all das Wasser in unserem Körper sich vereinigt hat und als blubbernde Blase im Inneren für seltsame Geräusche sorgt. “Sylvania” führt das Spiel mit fordernden Beats und schrägen Harmonien noch mal etwas konzentrierter fort und “Petrified” lässt uns mit leicht vereiertem Glockenspiel dann doch wieder an Boards of Canada denken, hier sogar inklusive melancholischer Grundstimmung. Ist aber okay, weil wirklich gut.

Doof, dass dann zum Abschluss noch einmal die Banalität übernimmt – eine 50jährige erzählt davon, wie sie sich fühlt, in ihrem Leben, und dass sie jetzt zu malen angefangen hätte. Manchmal fühle sie sich ein wenig isoliert, sagt sie. Vor allem wenn es regnet. Aaaah ja… können wir da nur sagen. Und bestätigen, dass die Frau wie ihre anderen Geschlechtsgenossinnen recht isoliert lebt auf dieser Platte, die ansonsten wirklich viel Qualität hat. Muss ja nicht immer Boards of Canada sein. Kelpe kann’s auch.

KELPE – SEA INSIDE BODY – D. C. RECORDINGS – DC 53 LP – 7/10

About Post Author




Happy

Happy

0 %


Sad

Sad

0 %


Excited

Excited

0 %


Sleepy

Sleepy

0 %


Angry

Angry

0 %


Surprise

Surprise

0 %

Jiri.Ceiver – Ycool 10″

0 0
Read Time:2 Minute, 32 Second

ceivercool

Auf ycoolen Abwegen

Eigentlich ist eigentlich ja ein echt ätzendes Wort. So etwas die die kürzeste Variante des sich mal so rein gar nicht festlegen wollens. Ausflucht, Ausrede, Ausweichmanöver. Aber manchmal braucht man so ein eigentlich wirklich. So ein ganz dickes fettes sogar. Wie bei dem Ding hier. Denn EIGENTLICH hat Jiri.Ceiver – sein bürgerlicher Name ist Arno Paul Jiri Kraehahn – Mitte der 90er ziemlich derbe Techno Sachen gemacht. Harthouse Style eben. Ich persönlich fand das Label ja bei aller Würdigung der Pionierarbeit teilweise echt schwer zugänglich, um es mal nett zu formulieren. Aber man muss anerkennen, dass sie stilistisch durchaus viel Offenheit gezeigt haben und dabei manchmal echte Perlen hervorbrachten.

“Ycool” zum Beispiel. Ich weiß nicht, wie viel Airtime Harthouse so auf Viva hatte in dieser Zeit – aber dieses Stück war da zu sehen, wie man leicht auf Youtube herausfinden kann. Und wenn man nicht genau wüsste, dass das genau dieser Jiri.Ceiver ist, und das tatsächlich auf Harthouse raus gekommen war, dann würde man sich die Augen reiben und denken, dass irgend ein Vollidiot die Tapes verwechselt hat, oder zumindest kräftig bei der Geschwindigkeit daneben gelangt hat.

Denn die Originalversion “Ycool – Jiri. vs. Jinks” ist so gar nicht schnell, so gar nicht Techno, so rein gar nicht elektronisch, sondern eigentlich ein schwer schleppender dreckiger Blues. Zumindest ist das eine Beschreibung, die dem, was man da hört, am nächsten kommt. Ein bis in die langsamste Zeitlupe runtergedrehter und zementschwer schleppender Drum Beat, eine arschcoole Bassline und ein paar clever rein editierte Bluesgitarren, angereichert mit Sprachsamples, die den bekifften Gesamteindruck noch mal verstärken – man muss sich ernsthaft fragen, was man alles anstellen muss, um mit so einem dreckigen Bastard Blues daher zu kommen.

Vermutlich wäre mir dieses Stück nie aufgefallen, wenn nicht die großen Downbeattrüffelschweine von Boozoo Bajou das Ding auf ihren “Juke Joint” Sampler geholt hätten. In einer ohnehin schon großartigen Auswahl war das die mit Abstand feinste Empfehlung. Und mit ein bisschen Glück fand ich die 10″ dann auch noch auf Ebay. Die Freude war groß.

Eigentlich (ja klar, jetzt wo ich nen Grund hab, hol ich gleich die Zehnerpackung eigentlich raus) hat so eine 10″ zwei Seiten. Aber eigentlich hätte hier auch eine gereicht. Seite zwei bietet zum gleichen Stück noch Russ Gabriel’s 12 Bar Desert Mix. Nur – nach so einer ultrafetten Portion Coolness auf Seite 1 hat der gute Russ nicht wirklich eine Chance. Sein Versuch, das Ganze ins Gegenteil zu verkehren und den Beat als Drum&Bass Version zu verdoppeln, ist sicher nicht dumm, und die edlen Rhodes Akkorde sind auch nicht verkehrt, aber klar, viel mehr als registrieren wird man die zweite Seite nicht.

Ist auch egal. Way fucking cool, die Nummer. Also das Original. Seite 1. Und nicht den Fehler machen und dem Aufdruck auf dem Label Glauben schenken. Bei Harthouse hat man wohl gedacht, das ist ne langsame Nummer, die läuft auf 33. Aber so langsam ist sie nun auch wieder nicht. Das Ding läuft auf 45. Und wie.

JIR.CEIVER – YCOOL 10″ – HARTHOUSE – 28186.0015.0 – 7/10

About Post Author




Happy

Happy

0 %


Sad

Sad

0 %


Excited

Excited

0 %


Sleepy

Sleepy

0 %


Angry

Angry

0 %


Surprise

Surprise

0 %

Glance – Never In Time

0 0
Read Time:3 Minute, 27 Second

glancenever

Doch doch, das ist aus Darmstadt

House ist weit mehr ein deutsches Phänomen als mancher denkt. Nicht nur weil Kraftwerk auf “Computerwelt” ein paar Dinge gemacht haben, die von Dancefloor Producern gern aufgegriffen und weitergeführt wurden, sondern viel mehr auch deswegen, weil sich in Deutschland immer mal wieder ein paar talentierte Leute erstaunlich stilvolle House Projekte gestartet haben. Man denke nur an Terry Lee Brown und Plastic City.

Ganz so weit wie die Mannheimer hat man es ein paar Kilometer weiter nördlich nicht geschafft – diese LP ist die einzige, die der Darmstädter Produzent Thorsten Scheu veröffentlicht hat. Was natürlich nicht heißen muss, dass es deswegen automatisch eine wenig hörenswerte Platte wäre. Schon allein aus Interesse an der deutschen House Szene um die Jahrtausendwende ist es spannend, sich diesem Album noch einmal zu widmen.

Eins muss man Thorsten Scheu auf jeden Fall lassen: Er geht durchaus stilvoll zu Werke, und er weiß sich gekonnt im Katalog der Deep House Stilmittel zu bedienen. Die Stücke lassen sich viel Zeit (meist deutlich über sieben Minuten), werden in aller Ruhe aufgebaut, und sind größtenteils klar davor gefeit, allzu platt oder zu gerade daher zu kommen. Käsige Sounds sind selten, die Beats sind gern etwas gebrochen und mit einem kleinen Hauch lateinamerikanischem Einfluss gewürzt, und vor allem vermeidet Scheu die in diesem Genre oft so beklagenswerten Simpelakkordwechsel.

Dass dadurch den Stücken auch so ein klein wenig Großstadt-Tristesse anhaftet, die auch vom ansprechend gestalteten Cover ausgeht, verleiht dem Album eher noch einen Reiz als dass es den Genuss schmälert. Der Opener “Move When I Move (Lift Off)” ist ein gutes Beispiel. Sehr entspannt, souverän produziert. Schwieriger wird es schon, wenn sich Scheu auf die Dienste von Gastvokalisten verlässt. Das schleppend soulige “We Can Be Good” zum Beispiel ist zwar fein arrangiert, aber die gesangliche Unterstützung zeigt das, was bei deutschen Houseproduktionen oft als Achillesferse ausgemacht werden muss – wird gesungen, sinkt das Barometer auf beliebig.

Gleiches gilt für “Guess”, das auf R&B beeinflusste Popmusik schielt, und bei dem der Gesang gefährlich nah an Lisa Stansfield liegt. Das mag damals irgendwie vielversprechend gewesen sein, wirkt heute aber natürlich recht dünn. Gastrapper Kazy Jumaking übt sich schwer in Smoothness und Flow, erzählt in “Question” auf deepem Beat zwischen lässiger Pose und motherfuckerwerfender Straßensprache – funktioniert primär, weil Scheu ihm ein eher entschlacktes, dezent treibendes Beatgerüst liefert, das mit rückwärts eingespielten Synth Strings über die nötige Verfremdungsebene verfügt. Nur dieses rhythmische eingestreute Poser-“Ah” von Kazy hat mich damals schon genervt.

Aber es geht ja auch ohne Vokalakrobatik. Wie auf “Second Life”. Schon hören wir wieder viel erfreuter hin. Noch so ein entspannter Deep House Groover, richtig lässig zusammengestellt, mit feiner Bassline, einigen Dub Effekten, schleppenden Schellenringen als Hihat Ersatz – da merkt man, wo bei Glance die Talente liegen. Davon ein ganzes Album und die Chance auf weitere Veröffentlichungen wäre vermutlich größer gewesen. Das hat in etwa das Niveau von Frankman, der gleichzeitig auf FM Recordings eine ganze Reihe feiner Deep House 12″es veröffentlichte.

Auch “The Happy People” kommt ohne Gesang aus, verwendet lediglich ein wenig Spoken Word, und lässt so dem Produzenten genügend Raum, um zu zeigen, dass er auch im Downtempo Eck recht versiert ist. Ein relaxter Hip Hop Beat, ein paar clever verfremdete Samples – ein nicht unspannendes Intermezzo, wie auch “Join Up”, das nicht viel mehr verwendet als einen trockenen Hip Hop Beat, ein paar sehr deep schwingende Orgelakkorde und ein paar Synth Beigaben. Nichts spektakuläres, aber gut produziertes Albumfutter.

Am Schluss ist “Caj” ist ein weiterer Beweis für die Qualitäten im entspannten Uptempo-Bereich – schon mehr Broken Beats als klassischer Deep House, opulent, aber nicht überfrachtet arrangiert, und erfreulicherweise weiß man hier, die Gesangsbeiträge geschamackvoll einzubauen, zu verfremden und in den Dub Raum zu schicken – schon wird es zwei Klassen lässiger.

House ging gut in Deutschland ums Jahr 2000 herum, und Glance war kein schlechtes Beispiel für das, was damals möglich war. Andere haben es erst einmal ohne Gesangsparts versucht und sind direkter auf die Tanzflächen gegangen – das wäre sicher auch für dieses Projekt keine schlechte Idee gewesen. Respektabel aber allemal.

GLANCE – NEVER IN TIME – STIR15 – STIR15-DLP3 – 6/10

 

About Post Author




Happy

Happy

0 %


Sad

Sad

0 %


Excited

Excited

0 %


Sleepy

Sleepy

0 %


Angry

Angry

0 %


Surprise

Surprise

0 %

Hardkandy – Second To None

0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 11 Second

hardtonone

Ist das der Mayfield?

Wieder eine von diesen Platten, die es verdient haben, in jeder guten Sammlung vertreten zu sein – und doch irgendwie nicht wirklich weit über den Radar derer hinaus gekommen ist, die ohnehin schon wussten, dass Hardkandy immer gute Alben baut. In diesem Fall sogar ein verdammt gutes. Wenn prominente Rezensionskollegen schon schreiben, dass die Welt mehr davon bräuchte, dann ist das a) richtig und b) ein guter Gedanke.

Wie so manch anderer fing Tim Bidwell mit seinem Projekt Hardkandy im instrumentalen Downbeat Bereich an. Ein wirklich guter, stilvoller Produzent, der es immer wieder schafft, hochwertige Ware für Kopfhörer und Bars zu erschaffen. Auch die nächsten Schritte sind nicht eben ungewöhnlich. Ein bisschen mehr stilistische Bandbreite und, vor allem, die Einbindung von Sängern. Auch hier beweist Bidwell viel Geschmack, indem er zum Beispiel beim Vorgängeralbum Terry Callier ins Studio einlud.

Was aber eindeutig nicht irgend welchen gängigen Abläufen entspricht, ist der Schritt zu diesem Album. Nicht weil Hardkandy zu einem neuen Label gegangen wäre, das passiert schon mal. Aber dass quasi von einer Veröffentlichung zur nächsten die Stilrichtung einfach mal so von qualitativ hochwertigem Downbeat auf eine Mischung aus Soul, Funk, und Blues umgestellt wird und dabei noch ein verdammt gutes Album heraus kommt, das ist dann schon eher selten.

Sicher – die Mischung, die Bidwell hier präsentiert, ist mit dem, was vorher geschah, durchaus noch kompatibel. Trotzdem ist es verblüffend, mit welcher Leichtigkeit, Eleganz und Überzeugungskraft er vom weißen britischen Barsound zu einem Stil kommt, der einen hoffen lässt, dass Curtis Mayfield nie gestorben sei.

Das liegt auch nicht nur an Seany Clarke, der als Gastsänger verdammt nah am großen Curtis liegt, sondern eben auch an Bidwell, der genau das richtige Material dazu liefert. Das geht schon in “Scum” los, ganz am Anfang, bei dem es richtig schön groovt, so warm und so lässig und so schwarz, dass man sich noch mal anschauen möchte, ob man wirklich die richtige CD in der Hülle hatte. Hier lernen wir auch schon die Eleganz zu schätzen, mit der bei Hardkandy Streicher eingesetzt werden – unaufdringlich, stilvoll, akzentuiert. Fein.

Clarke ist nicht der einzige interessante Gast auf dem Album: Ninja Tunes Fink ist mit dabei, John Hughes mit seiner Querflöte, Simon Little wurde aus Bonobos Live Band ausgeliehen, Laura Vane und Martin Harley singen ebenfalls mit. Das sorgt auch für Abwechslung, die bereits beim zweiten Stück prächtig zum Ausdruck gebracht wird – “Dunks” ist ein deutlich afrikanisch angehauchter Instrumental- Groover, dessen Streicher auf angenehme Weise an Quantic erinnern.

Aber schon “Overkill” bringt uns zurück zu Seany Clarke und schönen orgelseeligen Soul-Rückblicken, die einen ernsthaft fragen lassen, warum nicht mehr so funky Zeugs produziert wird. Ohne jede nostalgische Schwärmerei schiebt man bei Hardkandy den Mayfield-Sound ins 21. Jahrhundert. “My Morphine” siedelt den Sound ein klein wenig näher bei Ray Charles an – auch hier ist mit Martin Harley genau der richtige Sänger am Werk, und der Chorus ist so herrlich eingängig und soulig, dass es einem kleine Schauer den Nacken runter schickt. Die Laune steigt kräftig.

Ganze zwei Instrumentalstücke sind auf dem Album vertreten – und auch der zweite, “Moochin”, ist ein feiner Beitrag. Wie ein stilvolles Intermezzo, das einen von einem Soul Schuppen zum nächsten führt. Oder zurück zum Club Mayfield, bei dem die Band die Akustikgitarre herausgeholt und den kleinen Bläsersatz daneben gestellt hat. “The Others” ist eine coole kleine Nummer, in der sogar so ein ganz ganz klein wenig ganz früher Prince durchschimmert, mit viel Spielfreude obendrein.

Dagegen ist “Morning Light” trotz Unterstützung durch Fink und Harley ein etwas weniger starker Moment – etwas vorhersehbar, aber nichts, was einem den Genuss des Albums ernsthaft verleiden könnte. Nett halt. Aber nicht so stark wie das darauf folgende “Elevation”, das mit vielen hübsch lässigen Händen an diversen Gitarren und einem erneut feinen Streicher-Arrangement überzeugt – und einem ebenso starken und eingängigen Chorus.

Für “The Good And The Bad” geht es rüber in die Blues Bar, in der mit Nikolas Barrell ein weiterer Gastsänger einen sehr weißen, aber durchaus glaubwürdigen Einsatz hat. Dann endlich mal eine Frau am Mikrofon, und kaum hat sie angfangen zu singen, über trockenem, schnörkellosem Drumbeat, da denkt man schon, Moment mal, sind wir hier doch bei Tru Thoughts gelandet? Laura Vane in “Hey Lover” könnte man glatt als Alice Russell verkaufen.

Zum durchaus krönenden Abschluss kommt noch einmal ein feines Stück Funk auf die Bühne, hübsch entspannt, mit vorzüglichem Bass und einem perfekt begleiteten Seany Clarke. Das ist wirklich vorzüglich. Wie überhaupt die ganze Platte, die wirkt als wäre sie in irgend einem funky Zeitwurmloch aufgenommen worden, in dem sich alles, was Ende der 60er und Anfang der 70er den Soul so richtig fett cool werden ließ, niemals aufgehört hat zu existieren, und die Entwicklung in der Produktionsqualität trotzdem immer weiter gegangen ist.

Eine Platte wie aus einer besseren Welt. Nicht revolutionär besser, einfach nur lässiger, unbeschwerter, cooler, und eine in der Curtis noch lebt. Und der Weg dahin ist denkbar einfach. Insert CD , play, listen, smile.

HARDKANDY – SECOND TO NONE – WAH WAH 45s – WAHCD007 – 8,5/10

About Post Author




Happy

Happy

0 %


Sad

Sad

0 %


Excited

Excited

0 %


Sleepy

Sleepy

0 %


Angry

Angry

0 %


Surprise

Surprise

0 %

Hidden Orchestra – Archipelago

0 0
Read Time:4 Minute, 26 Second

archipelago

Ja nicht verstecken

Als Ninja Tune vor Jahren das erste Album des Cinematic Orchestra veröffentlichte, war das ein ziemlich ungewöhnlicher und interessanter Schritt, denn bis dahin war das Wort Jazz bei Ninja Tune eher so etwas, das man auf der Liste der Einflüsse hätte aufzählen können, aber weniger im Repertoire des Labels fand. Es war auch ein erfolgreicher Schritt, wie man weiß, und es folgten noch ein paar weitere interessante Acts wie zum Beispiel Jaga Jazzist und Skalpel.

Im Ursprung ist Tru Thoughts ein sehr mit den Ninjas verwandtes Label. Die Sicht auf das, was gute Musik ist, war schon immer recht ähnlich, die Musiker der Labels schätzen sich von jeher gegenseitig. Bonobo ist so etwas wie die deutlichste gemeinsame Schnittmenge – er fing seine Karriere bei Tru Thoughts an und wechselte dann zu Ninja Tune, veröffentlichte aber noch mal bei Tru Thoughts unter dem Namen Barakas.

Eine weitere Gemeinsamkeit: Bei aller Freude am Bedienen der etwas intelligenteren Tanzflächen pflegt man auch bei Tru Thoughts gern die modernen Formen des Jazz. So wie bei Ninja Tune dafür primär das Cinematic Orchestra zuständig war, stand bei Tru Thoughts Nostalgia 77 im Focus. Es dauerte lange, bis sich eine zweite Kraft neben Benedic Lamdin, dem Chef bei Nostalgia 77, etablierte. Die fand sich dann mit dem Hidden Orchestra, das aus dem Joe Acheson Quartet hervorging. 2010 erschien das erste, überaus gelungene Album des Hidden Orchestra, und 2012 das Album, um das es hier geht, “Archipelago”.

Um aber gleich mal die Dinge in die richtige Perspektive zu rücken: Selbst wenn insbesondere die Schlagzeugarbeit beim Hidden Orchestra die Wurzeln eindeutig im Jazz hat und die Arrangements oft geradezu orchestral sind, gibt es noch eine Fülle anderer Einflüsse, die eine “pure” Einordnung beim Jazz irreführend werden ließen. Die Verwendung elektronischer Elemente rückt das Ganze auch ein wenig in tanzbare Kategorien oder in die Nähe des Trip Hop, und der Chef der Band, Joe Acheson, hat ein großes Faible für das Verarbeiten von diversen Found Sounds, Ambient Elementen, alten Interviews, eben diversen anderen Soundquellen. Abgesehen davon freut man sich natürlich immer über den Besuch talentierter Gastmusiker – insbesondere Streicher und Bläser.

Dass sich daraus ein Stilmix ergibt, der tatsächlich nicht in wirklich großer Ferne des Cinematic Orchestra liegt, lässt sich an den Fingern einer Hand ausrechnen. Glücklicherweise kommt das Resultat aber auch nie in den Verdacht, als bloße Kopie angelegt zu sein. Zum einen hörbar anders, zum anderen einfach zu gut, zu durchdacht, zu speziell, um nicht originär sein zu können.

Schon die “Ouverture” – mit über sechs Minuten für eine Ouvertüre recht opulent – beweist das deutlich. Groß angelegt, mit vielen Streichern und Bläsern, einem leicht dramatischen Thema, führt uns das Orchester in die Stimmung des Albums ein, die gegenüber der des Erstlingswerks trotz der Getragenheit weniger düster wirkt. Die etwas positivere Grundstimmung wird dann von “Spoken” weitergeführt – mit einem Beat, der ohne Probleme so auch bei Amon Tobin hätte verwendet werden können. Trompete wiederum ein wenig früher Nils Petter Molvaer, würde man sagen. Aber auch hier: Das, was das Orchester da komponiert, musiziert, produziert, ist so gut, dass eine mögliche Ähnlichkeit mit noch lebenden oder auch nicht mehr unter uns weilenden Musikern schlicht nebensächlich ist.

Das dann folgende “Flight” beginnt mit Natursounds und einem Bassthema, einem Harfenspiel, das leicht an Dead Can Dance erinnert – viele perkussive Elemente (man merkt, dass zwei von den Mitgliedern des Hidden Orchestra am Schlagwerk sitzen), Cello, Kaval… Die Instrumentierung ist so reich wie die Bilder, die sich beim Hören des Titels aufbauen – fast möchte man meinen, man sei in einer Aufführung des Cirque du Soleil gelandet, bei der ausnahmsweise mal die Musik nicht den typischen Touch zu kitschig geraten ist.

Auch “Vorka” weiß mit spannender Komposition und tollem Arrangement für Spannung zu sorgen, und findet mit dem Spiel auf einer Säge ein passendes Element, um der cineastischen Seite des Stückes noch etwas morbides hinzuzufügen. “Hushed” ist ein verhaltenes, feines, von elegantem Klarinettenspiel durchzogenes Stück orchestraler Erzählung, “Reminder” ein etwas rhythmischerer Exkurs mit erneut leicht morbiden Zwischenspielen, die wiederum gut zu Amon Tobin oder einer dunklen Version des Herbalizer gepasst hätten, und “Seven Hunters” lässt fast übervolle Orchestrierung glänzen, die sich fast nur in ihrer Opulenz von der schönen Überzeugungskraft großer Momente des Cinematic Orchestra unterscheidet – und das gleich fast zehn Minuten lang.

Etwas kürzer kommt “Fourth Wall” daher – fast ein Kurzfilm. Atmosphärisch dicht, wie alles auf diesem Album. “Disquiet” lässt vom Titel her doch wieder an das etwas schaurig beklemmende Erstlingsalbum denken – und in der Tat sorgen die Streicher gleich für das Gefühl von drohender Gefahr, doch gleich sorgt die Harfe zumindest für Teilentwarnung. “Disquiet” zeigt schön, wie das Hidden Orchestra arrangiert um zu erzählen, immer wieder Szenen aufbaut, das Bühnenbild wechselt, die imaginäre Handlung weiter führt, den Hörer verlockt, immer weiter zu lauschen und zu erleben.

Das abschließende “Vainamoinen” ist dann fast mehr ein Epilog als “Ouverture” eine Ouvertüre war, ein schönes, von vielen Natursounds unterlegtes Schätzchen, das nach den spannenden Geschichten und großen Stürmen am Strand liegen bleibt und einen dafür belohnt, diese schöne und ereignisreiche Vorstellung des Hidden Orchestra besucht zu haben. Noch einmal wird ein feines Thema aufgebaut, angereichert, verziert, mit Kraft und Volumen versehen, auf den Weg geschickt, um uns nach dem Hören des Albums mit einem guten und bereicherten Gefühl wohlbehalten auf dem Sofa abzusetzen.

HIDDEN ORCHESTRA – ARCHIPELAGO – TRU THOUGHTS – TRULP261 – 8/10

 

About Post Author




Happy

Happy

0 %


Sad

Sad

0 %


Excited

Excited

0 %


Sleepy

Sleepy

0 %


Angry

Angry

0 %


Surprise

Surprise

0 %

Fila Brazillia – Maim That Tune

0 0
Read Time:5 Minute, 9 Second

fila brazillia maim

Immer diese komischen Titel

Fila Brazillia. Was für ein Name. Abgewandelt nach dem Namen einer Hunderasse, immer wieder Grund für Verwirrungen und Verschreibereien, und damit auch irgendwie typisch. Was haben die Herren sich für bizarre Song- und Albumtitel einfallen lassen… Der hier geht ja noch, auch wenn es etwas seltsam anmutet, wenn zwei amtliche Großmeister der Downbeat Musik ein Album “Verstümmele das Stück” nennen – aller Wahrscheinlichkeit ein skurriler Sound-Alike für “Name That Tune”, der Titel einer berühmten Musikrateshow.

Ist eine etwas skurrile und nicht immer leicht nachzuvollziehende Form von Humor. Ich zumindest habe keinen Schimmer, was der erste Titel dieses Albums mir sagen soll: “Dave Yang & Steve Yin De-Swish T’ Swish”. Mehr als das Yin und Yang Ding hab ich da nicht kapiert. Aber ist auch egal. Bei instrumentalen Stücken im Downbeat Bereich ist die Wahl des Titels sicher meist eine Frage der momentanen Laune und das Opfer diverser interner Jokes und Wortspielereien. Fakt ist jedenfalls, dass dieses Stück schon ganz gut zeigt, woran die Herren Steve Cobby und David McSherry ihre Freude haben: tiefenentspannte, stilistisch variable elektronische Musik, immer auf exzellentem Produktionslevel, bisweilen auch ein wenig verkopft.

Das ist vermutlich das interessante an Fila Brazillia – sie sind oft auf eine erstaunlich uncoole Art cool. Produzieren reihenweise richtig edle und einfallsreiche Downbeat Hits und sind dabei immer so ein wenig streberhaft und intellektuell unterwegs. “Maim That Tune” ist dabei vermutlich ihr zugänglichstes und lässigstes Album. Hier finden wir auch einen ihrer bekanntesten Titel, “A Zed And Two L’s”, der einen etwas lechter zu decodierenden Spaß beinhaltet – es ist ein Hinweis zur Schreibweise ihres Bandnamens. Im Kern elektronisch, bietet dieses Stück eine schön warme und vibrierende Synth Bass Line, einen maximal entspannten Beat, der mehrmals im Tempo verdoppelt wird, und – das gibt es nicht oft bei Fila Brazillia – Gesangssamples, in diesem Fall afrikanische. Für 1995 ist das schon ziemlich amtlich – die DJ Kicks von Kruder & Dorfmeister beispielsweise kam erst ein Jahr später auf den Markt und trat den Downbeat Trend eigentlich erst richtig los. Da waren Fila Brazillia schon am dritten Album.

Bei “Leggy” wird es dann aber schon wieder ein klein bisschen staksig – da arbeiten auch Fila Brazillia mal mit dem allzu simplem breiten Synth Akkordwechsel als Basis – rauf runter rauf, immer wieder. Hier merkt man, dass der Stil noch ein wenig in den Kinderschuhen steckt. Aus heutiger Sicht wirkt es ein wenig wie eine Art Fingerübung. Im Gegensatz zu “At Home In Space”, das ein paar sehr schöne Synth Strings zu bieten hat, die ein bisschen an Nightmares On Wax erinnern, deren “Nights Interlude” im gleichen Jahr erschien. Ein schöner schwarzer 60er Jahre Beat, ein bisschen Wah-Wah, eine satte Portion Synths und Querflöten – hier zeigt sich, dass die Herren eine ziemlich spannende stilistische Bandbreite aufzuweisen hatten. Zehneinhalb Minuten mit allerhand Intermezzi, Breaks und Schwelgereien – Kino fürs Ohr.

Dann kommt die 1 Meter 80 große Wespe – “6 ft Wasp”. Wohl klar auf den voluminös brummenden Bass Synth bezogen, der schwer verzerrt und in Begleitung eines Rock Beats und Gitarrenlicks daher kommt. Wieder eins von den Stücken, die ein wenig wie eine Übung wirken – das Thema variieren und mit verschiedenen Sounds und ein paar Sprachsamples garnieren – nett, aber nicht wirklich mehr.

“Slacker” ist dann fast schon im Techno Tempo unterwegs, rein elektronisch, die Sounds teilweise an Kraftwerk erinnernd, ein fast durchweg laufender Drone im Hintergrund, die Bassline wieder richtig weit im tiefen Bereich – und dann ein indischer Percussion Sample, der eigentlich noch mal Tempo machen soll, aber ein wenig fremd wirkt in diesem Arrangement, zumindest am Anfang. Hat man sich ein wenig an ihn gewöhnt und die Aufmerksamkeit mehr auf die diversen Synth Einsätze und Effektspielereien konzentriert, tut er dann aber doch genau das – Dampf machen. Elfeinhalb Minuten treiben sie das Spiel hier – recht generös bemessen. Aber wir wollen fair bleiben – ein Jahr später spült “Trainspotting” Underworld mit “Born Slippy” ganz nach oben – ganz so weit sind Fila Brazillia mit diesem Stück gar nicht von Underworld aus der “Dirty Epic” Zeit gar nicht entfernt.

Aber dann kommt das Downbeat Highlight schlechthin – “Harmonicas Are Shite”. Wieder einmal stellt man fest, dass Fila Brazillia stilistisch ihrer Zeit ein kleines Stück voraus waren, denn die Rhodes Akkorde, die Dubräume, der Beat, die Mundharmonika, der Bass, sogar die Breaks und die verhallten Gitarrenlicks – sämtliche Elemente dieses Stücks finden wir in den Jahren darauf bei den Remixes von Kruder & Dorfmeister wieder. Dieser Titel ist wie ein Bauplan für den “Transfattyacid” Remix, um mal ein Beispiel zu nennen. Und auch wenn hier Fila mehrfach etwas kopflastig und staksig beschrieben wird – dieser Track ist so arschcool, dass man das mehr als getrost hinnehmen kann.

Sogar den nächsten Titel, den Zirbeldrüsenextrakt, “Extract Of Pineal Gland”. Noch so ein komischer Titel, und wieder ein etwas unlockerer Anfang. Aber wir werden entschädigt. Die Bassline ist fein, der Beat wieder einmal extremst entspannt – selbst wenn man erneut sagen muss, dass es bei einem interessanten Ansatz bleibt, ist das auch nicht weniger spannend als das durchschnittliche Füllmaterial eines Thievery Corporation Albums (deren erster Longplayer übrigens auch erst zwei Jahre nach dieser Scheibe erschien).

Der Abschluss des Albums aber ist in meinen Augen die Krönung, auf eine ganz und gar unerwartete Art. “Subtle Body” ist, ich kann es nicht anders sagen, gute neun Minuten echte Schönheit. Ein Ambient Track, der mit nichts weiter arbeitet als ein paar leicht variierten Synth Akkorden, unendlich viel Hallraum, einigen meditativen Glockenklängen und ein paar dezenten elektronischen Spielereien. Ich weiß nicht, was Steve Cobby und David McSherry da geritten hat, was sie für Pilze gegessen haben, aber bei mir wirkt es Wunder. Seit Jahren hole ich dieses Stück immer mal wieder hervor und betreibe damit neun Minuten musikalische Meditation. Egal, was der Tag dir an Unbill gebracht hat, “Subtle Body” lässt es in der Tiefe des Hallraums sich selbst auflösen. Auch das bietet dieses Album – ein großes Stück Ambient.

In vielerlei Hinsicht ist “Maim That Tune” ein wegweisendes Album, dessen Weitsicht nicht jedem offenbar wurde. Aber für einen richtig lässigen Abend in der Bar ist zum Beispiel “Harmonicas Are Shite” immer noch gut zu gebrauchen. Und nicht vergessen – ein Z und zwei Ls.

FILA BRAZILLIA – MAIM THAT TUNE – PORK – PORK 027 – 7,5/10

About Post Author




Happy

Happy

0 %


Sad

Sad

0 %


Excited

Excited

0 %


Sleepy

Sleepy

0 %


Angry

Angry

0 %


Surprise

Surprise

0 %

Lee Konitz, Charlie Haden, Brad Mehldau – Alone Together

0 0
Read Time:5 Minute, 41 Second

Lee-Konitz-Alone-Together

Three Kings

Es ist ein gutes Zeichen, dass ich bei diesem Album unweigerlich zu reflektieren beginne, wie ich im Laufe meines Lebens in der Liebe zur Musik immer näher an den Jazz heran gekommen bin, es betrachte, einordne. Und es ist auch ein gutes Zeichen, wenn ich am Anfang einer Rezension deutlich spürbare Sorge erlebe, dem Thema gerecht zu werden. Ich bin kein Musiker, und immer wieder geistert dieser Gedanke durch meinen Kopf, dass ich ein richtig guter Musiker sein müsste, um ein Album wie dieses seinem Niveau entsprechend zu beschreiben.

Aber dann höre ich es noch mal und denke – nein, das ist Quatsch. Die drei Herren haben dieses Album nicht für Musiker gemacht. Keiner wird sich hinstellen und sagen, nein, du bist nicht qualifiziert genug, um dieses Album zu lieben. Und im Falle von “Alone Together” würde ich sogar wagen zu behaupten, dass vieles von dem, was es so besonders macht, eben nicht nur für den ausgebildeten Musiker erklärbar ist, sondern auch für den liebenden Laien spürbar.

Als Konitz, Haden und Mehldau zusammentrafen, um für dieses Album gemeinsam zu spielen, war Konitz, so heißt es, ein wenig vorsichtig, im Bezug auf Brad Mehldau. Er kannte ihn nicht, sie hatten noch nie zusammen gespielt, und Konitz sagte, dass er nie so schnell spielen könne wie ein Pianist. Dass Mehldau aber schon bald angefangen habe, sein Spiel zu verändern, um auf Konitz einzugehen, eine gemeinsame Ebene zu finden.

Für mich ist das etwas, das man diesen Aufnahmen auch anmerkt. Dass die drei einander zuhören, auf einander hören, schauen was da passiert, es aufnehmen, annehmen, verarbeiten, drauf eingehen, damit spielen. Und auch, dass es da keine großen Allüren gibt, keine Angebereien, kein Kämpfen oder Effekt haschen. Man hat fast ein wenig das Gefühl, dass es Brad Mehldau gut tut, mit zwei Legenden zu spielen, die zumindest sein Vater sein könnten, im Falle von Konitz sogar durchaus der Großvater. Konitz gibt vor, Mehldau nähert sich, begleitet, wagt sich vor, trägt bei – es tut ihm gut, ohne Zweifel.

Was dem Trio auch sehr gut tut: Es ist kein Schlagzeuger dabei. Nicht dass ich etwas gegen Schlagzeuger hätte, ganz gewiss nicht. Aber in diesem Fall gibt es dem ohnehin recht befreit und inspiriert aufspielenden Trio noch mehr Freiheit, und auf interessante Weise ist das abwesende Schlagzeug so etwas wie die Abwesenheit des Metronoms, einer Form von Zwang, eines mahnenden Antriebs. Man könnte sagen, dass sie so spielen, dass ein Schlagzeug fehl am Platze wäre – oder eben dass sie die Abwesenheit des Schlagzeugs in vollem Maße nutzen.

Das ist insofern beeindruckend, als dass es für diese Session keinen konkreten Plan gab. Konitz hat einfach Titel angesagt, und das Trio hat losgelegt – ohne dass man sich da groß abgesprochen hätte. So erklärt sich auch ein wenig die Auswahl der Titel, die nicht unbedingt besonders einfallsreich oder ungewöhnlich wäre. Es sind Standards. “Alone Together”, “What Is This Thing Called Love”, “‘Round Midnight” – wäre nicht das Ergebnis so großartig, würde mancher zickige Connaisseur sich genötigt sehen, eine Augenbraue nach oben zu ziehen.

Aber so… Kritik nicht denkbar, beim besten Willen nicht. Der Einfallsreichtum, die Lebendigkeit, die große Klasse, die offensichtliche Freude am sich zuhören und entdecken machen jedes der sechs Stücke zu einem selten großen Genuss. Es lebt eine schöne Balance in diesem Trio, zwischen den drei Protagonisten und ihren Fähigkeiten, die – da muss ich mich einfach wiederholen – durch die Abwesenheit des Schlagzeugs offen gelegt wird.

Wer nur ein ganz klein wenig Freude am Jazz hat, wird schon im ersten Stück “Alone Together” unweigerlich zum lächelnden Liebhaber. Mit viel Behutsamkeit spielen die drei sich hinein in den Abend, gewöhnen sich aneinander, bis es Zeit ist, den Solisten Raum zu geben, den Brad Mehldau sehr zu nutzen weiß. Eben noch fast zaghafter Begleiter von Lee Konitz, spielt er im nächsten Moment ein Solo, von dem man glaubt spüren zu können, dass es von Konitz beeinflusst ist, ohne dass dieser eingreift, sondern nur weil er auch auf der Bühne ist. Und als Konitz dann nach dem Solobeitrag von Haden zum Instrument greift und kurz mit Mehldau improvisiert, wird deutlich, dass an diesem Gefühl wohl auch etwas dran ist.

“The Song Is You” zeigt erneut, wie gut das warme und zugleich entspannte und präzise Bassspiel von Charlie Haden der Soloarbeit von Brad Mehldau tut – ich kann mir nicht helfen, aber irgendwie ist Mehldau mir auf diesen Aufnahmen ein ganzes Stück sympathischer als auf vielen seiner – nichtsdestotrotz großartigen – Art of the Trio Aufnahmen. Ähnliches gilt für “Cherokee”, in dem Mehldau seine Mitspieler schon einmal etwas mehr herauszufordern scheint, was Haden und Konitz eher dankbar aufnehmen als dass es sie irgendwie überraschen könnte. Brad kann machen, was er will, und man glaubt zu spüren, dass die Leichtigkeit, mit der seine Mitspieler auf ihn reagieren, ihn ein klein wenig befreit, einen Hauch ungezwungener und der Freude hingegeben sein lässt.

Spätestens bei “What Is This Thing Called Love” hat man den Eindruck, dass die drei nicht erst seit ein paar Stunden zusammen musizieren, sondern schon seit Jahren. Klar, ist ein Standard, das macht es sicher leichter – und doch ist gerade hier das Spiel zu dritt am elegantesten, am harmonischsten. Und wieder freut man sich, wie Haden es schafft, dem meist unterstützenden, Halt gebenden Spiel eine Präsenz zu geben, die fast verblüffend ist. Ein warmer Boden aus Spielfreude, auf dem sich Mehldau hier ganz besonders wohl zu fühlen scheint. Wirklich wunderbar, und man hört die Verzückung des Publikums am herrlich abrupten Ende seines Solos – sie gilt definitiv nicht nur Mehldau, sondern auch Haden, der direkt danach ein weiteres seiner luftigen, vibrierenden und unaufgeregten Soli spielt.

Die fast dreizehnminütige Version von “‘Round Midnight” ist – wie sollte es auch anders sein – ein weiterer Beweis für die besondere Art, in der bei diesen Aufnahmen die drei Musiker aufeinander hören und sich gegenseitig entdecken. Mehldau gibt Haden hier einmal sehr viel mehr Raum, begleitet ihn fast nur, lässt ihn vibrieren, auch das ist ein schönes und interessantes Erlebnis. Am Ende ist “You Stepped Out Of A Dream” ein fast schwärmerisches Fazit dieser Begegnung. Leichtfüßig, fast fröhlich bewegen sich die drei in diesem Klassiker, offensichtlich bester Laune.

Dieses Album gehört zu denen, die einen dankbar sein lassen, dass man sich dereinst entschieden hat, eine ordentliche Anlage zu kaufen, auf der man so schöne Musik wie diese wirklich würdigen kann. Ich persönlich hätte es noch schöner gefunden, wenn das gute Stück auch als Schallplatte zu erwerben wäre, durchaus auch wegen des schönen Covers in bester Blue Note Tradition. Und es gehört zweifelsohne zu den Alben, die einen dazu ermahnen, so oft es geht ins Konzert zu gehen. So etwas ist nur noch dann schöner, wenn man es direkt erlebt. “Alone Together” macht sehr viel Freude. Man möchte sich nach dem Hören bedanken. Das sagt alles.

LEE KONITZ, CHARLIE HADEN, BRAD MEHLDAU – ALONE TOGETHER – BLUE NOTE – 724385715020 – 10/10

 

 

About Post Author




Happy

Happy

0 %


Sad

Sad

0 %


Excited

Excited

0 %


Sleepy

Sleepy

0 %


Angry

Angry

0 %


Surprise

Surprise

0 %